Nova Scotia Archives

Au cœur de l'Acadie

Registres du gouvernement britannique à Annapolis Royal, 1713-1749


Governor's Letter-Book, Annapolis, 1719-1742. 95


for Assistance, who Supplied him with money and other Effects to a very great Sum, in order to Enable him to prosecute his design, Whereupon the said Sieur L'Borgne sent over his Son to Secure & take care of his Intrest According to the Agreement made between them two And as things went Cross with Mons. La Tour he put the son in possession of most, if not all his Estate as a Security for the Debt; which not being as yet paid, the Sons Widow one of the Daughters by the said La Tour by Madam D'auney holds part of it to this day." After La Tour's death, Madam D'aunay and her five children, being much reduced and applying to the French king for relief, it was decreed upon her petition, that Belleisle, as a valuable consideration for the money advanced, should be seigneur and receive the rents and profits for seven years, and that the estate should be divided, share and share alike among her five children. This is asserted by the oldest people here and the decree is said to be contained in a book called “Arrèst de Court," which A. has not seen. If then the conveyance from her brother and one sister be held good, Mrs. C. can be entitled only to one-fifth, and those of the other branches who are now and always have been in the province, to their respective shares. The value of the rents not so great as is asserted, but about the same as those of Annapolis; account of which has been sent to the Board. A. submits further that no governor could give away what is always considered the property of the King, without special orders from home communicated to the Council. Unless Mrs. C. is limited in her claims, the B. of T. will be "Eternally troubled with ContinuaIl Claims by the other Coheirs her Aunts & Cousins," who, upon thoughts of leaving the province made the conveyances (and, A, is informed, only conditionally) on which she founds her claims; and not her brothers and sisters.
 
1734.


Although English subjects, on account of their fewness, ought to be used with tenderness, a vacancy is better than a deceitful member, and A. has suspended Wm. Winniett from his seat, on information laid against him, "and his other disrespectfull & Contemptuous behaviour not only in Council but likewise abroad." Acknowledges receipt of Secretary
 


             

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